Slate Legal Correspondent

She co-authored “Me v. Everybody: Absurd Contracts for an Absurd World” (Workman Publishing, 2003), a book of legal humor, and “I Will Sing Life: Voices from the Hole in the Wall Gang Camp” (Little, Brown & Co., 1992), a book about seven children in Paul Newman`s camp who have life-threatening illnesses. Dahlia Lithwick is a Canadian writer and editor based in the United States. Lithwick is editor-in-chief at Newsweek and editor-in-chief at Slate. She writes dispatches and Supreme Court jurisprudence and has handled the Microsoft lawsuit and other legal issues for Slate. Prior to joining Slate as a freelancer in 1999, she worked for a family law firm in Reno, Nevada. Her work has appeared in The New Republic, The American Prospect, ELLE, The Ottawa Citizen and The Washington Post. Author; Senior Legal Correspondent, Slate; Podcast host, Amicus Podcast Dahlia Lithwick is Slate`s editor and legal correspondent and host of the Amicus podcast. She writes Supreme Court Dispatches and has handled the Microsoft lawsuit and other legal matters for Slate. Prior to joining Slate as a freelancer in 1999, she worked for a family law firm in Reno, Nevada. Her work has been published in the New Republic, Elle, the Ottawa Citizen and the Washington Post.

She is the co-author of Me v. Everybody: Absurd Contracts for an Absurd World, a book of legal humor. She is a graduate of Yale University and Stanford Law School. In 2018, Lithwick received the American Constitution Society`s Progressive Champion Award and the Hillman Award for Opinion and Analysis. She won a National Magazine Award in 2013 for her columns on the Affordable Care Act. She has twice received an online journalism award for her legal commentary. In October 2018, she was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Prior to joining Slate, she worked for a family law firm in Reno, Nevada, and worked for Procter Hug, Chief Justice of the Ninth District Court of Appeals, in 1996. Her work has appeared in New Republic, Commentary, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Elle and CNN.com. She is a weekly legal commentator for NPR`s Day to Day. For most of American history, abortion was legal and banned only from 1867 to 1973.

Now, the U.S. Supreme Court could ban it again by repealing Roe v. Wade. Ahlia Lithwick, 37, an editor and legal correspondent for Slate, writes the Supreme Court Dispatches column and has covered Microsoft`s lawsuit and other legal issues. She was a regular guest on The Al Franken Show and a guest columnist for the New York Times opinion site. Lithwick is Slate`s legal correspondent, providing summaries and commentary on recent U.S. Supreme Court cases. Lithwick also hosts the Amicus podcast. In 2001, she received the Online News Association Award for Online Commentary.[8] [6] Dahlia Lithwick is Slate`s senior legal correspondent and host of Amicus, Slate`s award-winning biweekly podcast on law.

His work has been published in The New York Times, Harper`s, The New Yorker, The Washington Post, The New Republic and Commentary, among others. Also author of the book “Lady Justice”. Lithwick won a National Magazine Award in 2013 for its columns on the Affordable Care Act. In October 2018, she was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dahlia Lithwick is a Canadian-American lawyer, writer and journalist. Lithwick is currently editor-in-chief at Newsweek and editor-in-chief at Slate. She writes primarily about law and politics in the United States. She writes dispatches and Supreme Court jurisprudence and has handled the Microsoft lawsuit and other legal issues for Slate. In 2018, the Sidney Hillman Foundation awarded Lithwick the Hillman Prize for Opinion and Analysis Journalism, noting that she “has been the best legal commentator in the country for two decades.” [2] Panelists discuss what to expect during the lame session, the future direction of both parties in the midst of a divided Congress, and polls that were wrong and fair midterm. Dahlia Lithwick is an editor at Slate, where she has written her “Supreme Court Dispatches” and “Jurisprudence” columns since 1999. His work has been published in The New York Times, Harper`s, The New Yorker, The Washington Post, The New Republic and Commentary, among others.

She hosts “Amicus,” Slate`s award-winning biweekly podcast on law and the Supreme Court. Kimberly D. Krawiec, International Surrogacy With Stephen Wilkinson (Taboo Trades) Lithwick received her B.A. in English from Yale University and her J.D. degree from Stanford University. She is currently working on a new book, Lady Justice, for Penguin Press. In 2009, Lithwick wrote an article for Slate titled “I Need a Hero: Looking for a Passionate, Visionary, Liberal Scalia for a Supreme Court Seat.” In the article, she called on President Obama to appoint a person who was “a cross between Rachel Maddow and Emma Goldman.” Lithwick was born into a Jewish family[4][5] in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada and is a Canadian citizen. She moved to the United States to study at Yale University, where she earned a bachelor`s degree in English in 1990. As a student at Yale, she debated as a member of the Yale Debate Association in the American Parliamentary Debate Association. In 1990, she and her debate partner at the time, Austan Goolsbee, were finalists for the National Team of the Year. While votes for the midterm elections are still being counted, panelists discuss why neither Republicans nor Democrats celebrate, why the right underperformed, and how this election took place.

Dahlia Lithwick teaches the short course The Supreme Court: Before, During and After Ruth Bader Ginsburg. When Congresswoman Karen Bass is officially announced as the next mayor of Los Angeles, the homelessness crisis continues to grow here and Angelenos loses faith in City Hall. Join our exclusive fundraising launch event to meet selected speakers while supporting public media and local journalism. Richard M. Re, Using Sport to Teach Law (WVTF Radio) She then studied law at Stanford University, where she received her J.D. in 1996. She then worked for Judge Procter Hug on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. [6] She is Jewish and has a kosher house.

[7] Be the first to know about new speakers and sessions, as well as special events. Danielle K. Citron, aka Musk, granting `amnesty` for suspended Twitter accounts (The Associated Press) Give a Beat is a nonprofit organization that trains incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people to become DJs and engineers in the music industry. Co-founder Lauren Segal talks about her programs. Marine ecologist Carl Safina on wolves, whales and the wonders of nature. Representative Karen Bass is running against Rick Caruso in the Los Angeles mayoral race. She talks about how it would mitigate crime and homelessness and why black-brown relationships haven`t been broken. The Crosscut Festival is a celebration of big ideas and bold ideas – a gathering of a community of curious people. Connect with notable political leaders and news providers, as well as authors, journalists, and experts focused on the most important issues of our time.

The Crosscut Festival features fireside talks, panels and special events that explore forward-thinking in politics, social justice, the environment, history, innovation and more. School board elections affect the half a million students of LA Unified, and powerful actors spend a lot of money on the candidates they have chosen. Who are they?. When the U.S. Supreme Court refused to stop a draconian new abortion law in Texas, especially since Roe v. Ms. Lithwick received the Online News Association award for her online commentary in 2001. She received a B.A. in English from Yale University in 1990 and a J.D. from Stanford Law School in 1996.

About the author

Newslinkin staff